COLLECTORS' CHRONICLES

Margherita Missoni Amos, Daisies


Missoni, with pieces from her collection, in her favorite dress — a green and pink daisy number from a vintage fair in Northern Italy.

Margherita Maccapani Missoni Amos had a collection before she even knew she had a collection. “Margherita means daisy in Italian, so I’ve been given pieces with daisies on them since I was born,” she says. The granddaughter of the founders of storied Italian label Missoni, Margherita spent much of her adolescence rejecting the flower behind her namesake (“I couldn’t even look at one more daisy”), but as time went on, she embraced the symbol, which even became the logo for her kidswear line, Margherita. “Now, I would guess that I have close to 200 pieces in my personal collection.”

It’s no surprise then that her home in Montonate, Italy is rife with daisy accents, fashion, and ephemera — many pieces gifted from friends and family who saw a daisy something and just had to get it for her. “If you start paying attention, the daisy is everywhere – in designer’s prints, jewelry, home décor,” Missoni says. The select pieces Missoni acquired herself are hauls from trips to flea markets – one of her favorite pastimes. “They’re our greatest family passion that my mom inherited from her mom, and I inherited from her,” she says, of the hobby that all the women now also pursue online. Collecting is in the blood. “My grandmother Rosita collects shell lamps and mushroom trinkets; my mother has more than 300 pieces of wicker. We really love searching and finding and discovering.”

Children’s jewelry, on a plate that her grandmother found at a flea market.

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Missoni’s most treasured piece: a brooch from her late great grandmother, Diamante, whose name means “diamond.”
Gifted to her by her mother, who found it online, this YSL set was initially "a bit too eighties,” so Margherita cropped the top.


“The cup and saucers are from our local flea market, which is my absolute favorite,” says Margherita, who also collects fish décor and ephemera, in honor of her astrological sign Pisces. “I go to markets everywhere—I always try to arrive in a new city on a Sunday so I can go to its local flea. I think it’s the best way to understand the culture of a country—not just the contemporary, but the old part. You see where the culture comes from, and you understand what has gone out of fashion there.”

1884 Dominick & Haff Sterling Chased Pitcher with Sterling Bowl

1884 Dominick & Haff Sterling Chased Pitcher with Sterling Bowl

Current Bid:
$150
Mexican Sterling Silver and Turquoise Concho Belt

Mexican Sterling Silver and Turquoise Concho Belt

Current Bid:
$235
Kirk Stieff "Repoussé" Sterling Silver Serving Utensils
Pickup Available
TIMONIUM, MD

Kirk Stieff "Repoussé" Sterling Silver Serving Utensils

Current Bid:
$185
Vintage S. Kirk & Son "Repoussé" Sterling-Handled Carving Set
Pickup Available
TIMONIUM, MD

Vintage S. Kirk & Son "Repoussé" Sterling-Handled Carving Set

Current Bid:
$80
Many of Missoni’s pieces have sentimental value, like rings from South America, gifted from her father, and a rosary necklace, made with real flowers in resin, from her stepmother.


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“I love jumpsuits, and I bought this one for myself online,” says Missoni. “I love the bold print – it’s a perfect summer outfit: you put it on and it’s super easy, but it makes a statement. I still find daisies in the collections every season, especially Prada and Miu Miu.” Missoni considers herself lucky to be the frequent recipient of daisy gifts. “But I occasionally make exceptions and buy something for myself,” she says. “I recently fell for a pair of Dolce & Gabbana macramé shorts.”

A straw headpiece from Colombian brand Magnetic Midnight; Maison Michel silver headpiece (on plate), and pillbox for storing baubles.

“My ceramicist friend creates figurines of women with natural elements, so of course, when she made one with daisies, I bought it,” says Missoni. The designer and her grandparents — collectors themselves — appear in the framed photo. “My grandmother especially loves the mushroom symbol, so her apartment in the mountains is mushroom-themed,” says Missoni. “There must be more than 300 mushrooms everywhere, in every corner. Mushroom chairs, stools, plates.”

The black purse is from the 1960s. “In the sixties daisies were everywhere,” says Missoni. The designer’s stepmother gifted her and husband Eugenio the red lamp art piece with a symbol from their wedding: a genie and a daisy.
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